MEDIA RELATIONS: TODAY, DIRECTING CHANGE

Students create powerful videos about suicide prevention: ‘It could save a life’

By: Scott Stump, Today.com

Ben Finnie never wants another family to feel the pain that his endured last summer when his older cousin committed suicide.

Kaleigh Finnie, 19, a bubbly college student from the Woodlands, Texas, took her life on June 15, 2015, leaving her family to wonder what they could have done to prevent the tragedy. speak-loud-enough-mental-health-teens-today-tease-160524_e512195cfc376e6d477a99becfdd7840-1-today-inline-large

“I think if she had have reached out, her parents and her friends and family would’ve done everything they could for her,” Ben Finnie told TODAY. “Talking to them in the aftermath, they were so broken up. They feel like it’s their fault, when it’s not. They would’ve done anything to help her.”

Finnie, 16, is now helping to spread the word about suicide prevention and erase the stigma of mental health issues by working with the Directing Change program in California. The student at Murrieta Valley High School is one of more than 2,000 California high school and college students who have created 60-second public service announcement videos about suicide and mental health to raise awareness around the state.

To continue reading click here to be directed to Today.com.

MEDIA RELATIONS: FRESNO BEE, DIRECTING CHANGE

Squashing a stigma: Clovis East students place second in suicide prevention film contest

MEDIA RELATIONS: GRUNION GAZETTE, Food For Long Beach Kids

GROUPS TRY TO END LONG BEACH STUDENTS’ HUNGER

By: Emily Thornton, Grunion Gazette

An effort to help end hunger among Long Beach Unified School District students who receive free meals has gotten larger.556659b9325a4.image

That’s because two groups — Team 100 and Food Finders — have joined hands to bring food to Title One schools, or those with a high percentage of students from low-income families.

They’re calling their group Food for Long Beach Kids, benefitting the 54,000 or so LBUSD students who live with families below the poverty level and are on the free meal program.

“It means they’re going hungry on the weekend when they aren’t at school to receive free meals,” said Kelsey Duckett, founder of Seventy Seven Enterprise, a company doing volunteer media outreach for Team 100.

“The goal is that all Title One students on the free meal program will get food,” she said.

Click here to be directed to the Grunion Gazette.